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Frequently Asked Questions

If I live in a Project-based or Mod Rehab unit, will Seattle Housing Authority be my landlord?

Possibly. Most Project-based units and all Mod Rehab units are owned by other organizations. However, Seattle Housing Authority does own and manage some Project-based buildings through its Impact Property Management division. If you move into one of these units then Seattle Housing Authority would be your landlord.

If I have a tenant-based Housing Choice Voucher but move into a Project-based or Mod Rehab unit, do I get my Housing Choice Voucher back when I move out?

No. If you move into a Project-based or Mod Rehab unit, you give up your tenant-based voucher.

Is there a limit on how many people can live in the unit with me?

Yes. Your landlord can tell you the maximum number of people that can stay in your unit and whether you may add new members to your household. Seattle Housing Authority uses the number of bedrooms to determine how many people can live in units in its buildings.

If I am living in a Project-based or Mod Rehab building, may I transfer to another building in one of these programs?

You may move from one Project-based or Mod Rehab building to another, but you will have to submit a new application for the new building. Eligibility requirements may vary among buildings.

If I am living in a Project-based or Mod Rehab building, may I transfer anywhere else and still receive assistance?

No. Assistance only helps pay for specific units in buildings managed by landlords in the Project-based and Mod Rehab programs.

If I move into a Project-based or Mod Rehab unit, may I still remain on Seattle Housing Authority's waiting lists for other housing programs?

Yes.

If my income changes, do I need to report the change to my landlord?

Yes. You must report any income changes in writing within 10 business days to your landlord. If your income increases, the amount you pay for rent and utilities may increase. If your income decreases, the amount you pay may be reduced. If you don’t report an income increase you could lose your housing assistance and be required to repay Seattle Housing Authority for any overpayment.

Would I have to move if I became "over income?"

Possibly. If you become "over income" your landlord will require you to pay the full rent amount—without assistance from Seattle Housing Authority—or move to a non-subsidized unit so that an eligible family could move into the unit you had occupied.

If I set up a payment agreement with Seattle Housing Authority, may I pay my debt through the landlord?

No, you need to pay Seattle Housing Authority directly.